Kauri Locations

See a larger image of the Kauri Dieback Distrbution map (4.35MB).

This map shows the general locations of kauri trees and of areas where there is infection by Phytophthora agathidicida (PA) – the pathogen that causes kauri dieback disease.

It shows the results of soil testing carried out after the Kauri Dieback Programme’s aerial surveillance identified an area that should be investigated.

Areas marked PA Positive are those where soil testing for the presence of PA has returned a positive result.

The full extent kauri dieback disease is likely to be greater than the extent of confirmed PA infection because infected kauri trees may not show symptoms of kauri dieback disease for up to 10 years, or even longer.

This map has been developed from the latest information supplied to Biosecurity New Zealand by Kauri Dieback Programme partners. * **

Testing work is continuing in many areas, so the picture of disease spread will change as we gather more information.

* This map is intended to be used as a guide only, in conjunction with other data sources and methods, and should only be used for the purpose for which is was developed. Although the information on this map has been prepared with care and in good faith, no guarantee is given that the information is complete, accurate or up-to-date.

** This map does not include some additional field data from the Auckland region, mainly from private land, gathered after 2015. 

Aerial Surveillance

See a larger PDF of the Kauri Dieback Programme Aerial Surveillance map (1.94MB). 

The Kauri Dieback Programme uses aerial surveillance to find areas where kauri trees show symptoms that may be caused by kauri dieback disease. Aircraft fly at low levels taking photographs.

Between 2011 and 2018, our aerial surveillance planes flew a total of 43,822 km – a distance greater than the circumference of the Earth.  This map shows the flight paths over areas with kauri. *

The latest, three-year programme, which ended in 2018, covered three million hectares.

We analyse the photographs for signs of symptoms that could be caused by kauri dieback disease, such as thinning canopy, yellowing leaves and dead or dying branches.

However, these symptoms may also be caused by other things such as drought and poor soil conditions. So we prioritise sites for further investigation and take soil samples around these trees – a process also known as ground truthing.

We test these soil samples to determine whether the pathogen Phytophthora agathidicida (PA) is present.

 

* This map is intended to be used as a guide only, in conjunction with other data sources and methods, and should only be used for the purpose for which is was developed. Although the information on this map has been prepared with care and in good faith, no guarantee is given that the information is complete, accurate or up-to-date.

 

Find out more about our Surveillance and Detection techniques and research.